It is all about fluidity

Abhigna Kedia uses resin extensively in her works of art

Abhigna Kedia defines herself as a fluid artist, because she works with resin. Resin, as most of us know is a liquid synthetic organic polymer. “It is usully in fluid form, more like an adhesive and is used for industrial purposes. It is used to make boats and sculptures. Very few artists use it as working with it is difficult. I work with layers of specialised mixed media techniques to create alternative abstract and expressionistic paintings,” says the young artist, who adds that she draws inspiration from human emotions for her art.

“For me I use colours to express emotions. When I feel a certain emotion and close my eyes, I see a colour and that colour goes into my work”. She has mostly used gold, browns and blues in her work. Gold, feels Abhigna, gives out a lot of energy, while browns and blues are warm colours.

She also paints on canvas and even has a work of art dedicated to her grandmother, which is “loaded with heavy gold as she was a very warm person who generated a lot of positivity.”

It is all about fluidity

She goes back to her childhood when she enjoyed subjects such as biology where she got to draw and sketch a lot. She also took a shine to Tanjore paintings, even though her version of paintings in this genre have a “north Indian take to them. The face, features and use of stones depicts the culture of the north.”

Though she also paints portraits and landscapes, she adds that she enjoys abstract paintings the most as “it is open to any form of interpretation. Sometimes you see people searching to express their emotions when they look at a work of art,” she says and adds, “Painting for me is meditative to an extent. I enter a space of tranquillity when I am working and that is what I want my works to express to every viewer,” says the artist, who completed her Bachelor’s in Visual Arts at Karnataka Chitrakala Parishath and has had shows in Bengaluru, Mumbai, Delhi and Dubai.

It is all about fluidity

Abhigna, born to a Marwari family reveals she always chooses “the road less taken. Most of my cousins and family studied commerce and got into business. I had decided in class 10 itself that it would be art for me. My family was flabbergasted, but now they are happy as I am able to sustain myself as an artist.”

She says, “I feel every parent should encourage children to take up art. There are ample opportunities now like social media, where your work can reach people far and wide.”

For more on her work you can log on to her website abhigna.me

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